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US B-52 Bombers Buzz East China Sea

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US Air Force Bombers Buzz Over the South China Sea

US Air Force B-52 bombers flew over the South China Sea in the vicinity of Japan in early August, according to a recent military statement from US Indo-Pacific Command, as section of a joint training mission with US Navy forces.

Two B-52 Stratofortress bombers from the Air Force and two P-8 Poseidon aircraft from the Navy conducted flights over the region to improve “joint force integration,” US Pacific Air Forces Public Affairs said August 3. The flights occurred August 1, they said.

Since 2004, the US Indo-Pacific Command (USINDOPACOM), previously just PACOM, enjoy conducted what’s called a “Continuous Bomber Presence” (CBP) program, the statement says.

According to USINDOPACOM, the drills were conducted inside the legal space carved out by international laws, a space it called “vital to the principles that are the foundation of the rules-based global operating system.”

The flights may enjoy carried on for more than a day, as pictures from the Air Force dated August 2 display a B-52 being refueled.

According to publicly available US government news announcements, the B-52 aircraft flew to the East China Sea after taking off from Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. After conducting the routine training mission the planes landed at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, a US territory in Micronesia.

In June, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying did not seem receptive to the presence of American bombers over the nearby South China Sea. “Running amok is risky,” she told reporters.

“China won’t be petrified by any so-called military ship or aircraft and we will only even more staunchly [retract] all necessary steps to defend the country’s sovereignty and stability, to protect the peace and stability of the South China Sea,” the spokeswoman said.

The US has repeatedly criticized Beijing for militarizing disputed areas of the South China Sea by erecting military infrastructure on island chains also claimed by several other nations. Early in June, after another B-52 foray into the region, Hua told reporters during a regular briefing: “I hope the US can acquire it clear whether it considers sending offensive strategic weapons like B-52 bombers to the South China Sea as militarization… If you often enjoy someone coming to your door heavily armed, shouldn’t you strengthen your security and defense capabilities?”

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Why is the TV show “SEAL Team” worth watching?

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seal team tv show - Why is the TV show "SEAL Team" worth watching?

Of the three major military dramas broadcasting these days on TV, the SEAL Team is the most sincere.

The TV shows (Wednesdays, 9 ET/PT, ★★½ out of four) works mostly because it’s not reaching beyond its comfort zone. Following a team of U.S. Navy SEALs carrying out covert operations with the aid of the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), it’s an uncomplicated action series without twists or unnecessary spectacle, at least so far.

TV veteran David Boreanaz (Bones) plays Jason Hayes, the leader of the Tier One Navy SEALs, and he’s an intense and focused guy not unlike the FBI agent he played for so many years on Fox’s series. Jason’s home life has crumbled due to his dedication to his work, and he’s haunted by the death of a teammate on a recent mission. The cast is rounded out by Jessica Paré (Mad Men) as a CIA analyst and Max Thieriot as a young and ambitious soldier trying to make it into the Tier One unit.

The TV drama plays to the strengths of its network, and its star. The missions are simple and paint the soldiers as patriotic and unimpeachably good. In last week’s second episode, Navy SEAL flirted with bigger questions about war and the state of the world, but all in the service of its core characters. The action is sharp, clean and often close up, prioritizing the soldiers’ points of view.

The lack of sensationalism is what makes Navy SEAL a stronger entry into the military genre this fall than NBC’s The Brave and CW’s Valor. The Brave is flashy, while Valor is twisty and ill-conceived, and neither has a cast as engaging.

U.S. Navy SEAL Team is straightforward, but also enjoyable. Sometimes simple works. Take a look:

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Elite Russian Special Forces in Astonishing Footage

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russian special forces - Elite Russian Special Forces in Astonishing Footage

Special Operations Forces of Russia, or SOF (Russian: Силы специальных операций; ССО, tr. Sily spetsial’nykh operatsii; SSO) are strategic-level special forces under the Special Operations Forces Command (Russian: командование сил специальных операций; KCCO, tr. Komandovanie sil spetsial’nalnykh operatsii; KSSO, or KSO) of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

Formation of first units for future Special Operations Forces began in 2009 as part of the overall reform of the Russian Armed Forces. Special Operations Forces Command was set up in 2012 and announced in March 2013 by the Chief of the General Staff Valery Gerasimov. According to Gerasimov, the SOF was designed as a strategic-level asset, whose primary missions would be foreign interventions, including sabotage and anti-terrorism operations. SOF do not belong to any branch of the Russian armed forces and are not to be confused with special forces that until 2010 were under the GRU and whose subsequent subordination appears to be unclear. Russia′s SOF are manned exclusively by professional personnel hired on contract, in commissioned officer positions.

The video compilation is showing various parts of Russian Special Operations Forces.

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