Capt. Andrew Olson, callsign “Dojo” showing off some awesome new moves with his F-35

Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson, F-35 Heritage Flight Team pilot and commander performs aerial maneuvers during the Bell Fort Worth Alliance Air Show Oct. 14, 2018, in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo: U.S. Air Force / Senior Airman Alexander Cook)

Following the U.S. Air Force’s official announcement of the new F-35A Lighting II Demonstration Team on December 4, 2018, demo pilot Capt. Andrew Olson, callsign “Dojo”, was captured in va ideo during what may be a partial practice session or a quick flyover at Luke AFB near Phoenix, Arizona.

Four videos appeared on Instagram on Thursday, January 10, 2019, and quickly collected over a thousand views. They were first posted by the 56th FW IG account and then reposted by @andyo_dojo, demo pilot Capt. Olson on Instagram.

The first video shows a remarkable sequence of maneuvers not previously seen at U.S. F-35A demonstrations where aerobatics were restricted. The first fully aerobatic F-35A demo was flown at the Paris Air Show in 2017 by Lockheed test pilot Billie Flynn.

In this clip, Capt. Andrew “Dojo” Olson approaches from the left, executes a pitch-up to the vertical with the first corner of a square loop to the inverted. Then it gets really good. Capt. Olson pulls back hard on the sidestick while inverted, backing off power and executing a quite tight loop. Once back to level flight, the F-35A begins a descending flat spiral at almost zero forward airspeeds. There is about one full 360° flat spin as Dojo repositions to exit show right.

Then, the remaining videos include a high AOA (Angle Of Attack), slow speed pass and a few vertical maneuvers as well as what seems to be a leaf of a cloverleaf maneuver.

These video hint at some of the maneuvers we’ll see in the new F-35A Demo Team routine beginning this spring at their first airshow appearance in Melbourne, Florida at the Melbourne Air & Space Show on March 30-31, 2019 at Orlando Melbourne International Airport.

Read the original article on The Aviationist. Copyright 2019. Follow The Aviationist on Twitter.