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Taliban Special Forces Recruit Training

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taliban commandos - Taliban Special Forces Recruit Training

In the tons of videos showing various special forces and their training, today we found something we could identify as the Taliban training video and some sort of so-called special forces. To defeat your enemy, you need to know him well. From this video, you can learn a lot about them, and to be honest, it looks like they are training for recess. Most have stated it looks as if they are competing for a cheer competition but given this author’s proclivity for dating cheerleaders and his failure to get out of going to their competitions, it’s quite clear the Taliban commandos wouldn’t be invited to any cheer competition.

Let’s not insult the great sport of cheerleading, by claiming these Taliban “commandos” are ready for any one of the teams in the “Bring It On” movies. But, most of us, could remember being told that the bad guys study us and adapt. They’ll use our tactics against us. After watching this video, I’m pretty sure all of that was a lie and in most cases I’m not sure it will ever happen.

The facts around the video are not clear. The men on footage can be seen sparring with wooden sticks and struggling through group press-up routines. At one point, a insurgent can be seen struggling to keep pace with others during a choreographed press-up routine.

Another bizarre scene in the footage shows dozens of aspiring commandos in combat gear jogging around a small clearing. According to the Military Times, the clip was captured in Afghanistan, but it is not clear exactly where in the country it was filmed or when.

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Navy SEAL Close Quarters Combat back in 2003

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delta force afghanistan - Navy SEAL Close Quarters Combat back in 2003

Close quarters combat or just CQC is the term mostly used by special forces operators. In fact, CQC is a tactical concept that involves a physical confrontation between several combatants. It can take place between military units, police/corrections and criminals, and other similar scenarios. In the last 20 years, a lot of major events permanently changed the world. The warfare shifted from large-scale operations to the small precise raids carried by special forces.

In warfare, CQC usually consists of small specialized units or teams engaging the enemy with small arms at the very short range, up to 100 meters, from proximity hand-to-hand combat to close-quarter target negotiation with short-range firearms.

In the typical close quarters combat scenario, the offenders try a very fast, violent takeover of a vehicle or structure controlled by the defenders, who usually have no easy way to withdraw. Because enemies, hostages/civilians, and fellow operators can be closely intermingled, close quarters combat demands a rapid assault and a precise application of lethal force. The operators need great proficiency with their weapons, and the ability to make split-second decisions in order to minimize accidental casualties.

Much material relating to close quarters combat is written from the perspective of the authorities who must break into the stronghold where the opposing force has barricaded itself. Typical examples would be commando operations behind enemy lines and hostage rescues.

Since the global war on terror, many things changed including the close quarters combat tactics and techniques. Navy SEALs, Delta, Green Berets, and all other SOF units are mostly unitarised their tactics and techniques, but still, they are developing their own styles with a slight difference between each. I have found a rare video of Navy SEAL operators training the CQC. Since then, principles of assault are relatively same: detailed planning, surprise, methods of entry, speed, the violence of action.

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Interview with legendary SAS Veteran John McAleese

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Legendary SAS hero - John McAleese 5

John Thomas “Mac” McAleese, MM was a Scottish soldier who took part in several late 20th century conflicts with the British Army’s Special Air Service (SAS) Regiment, including the famous storming of the Iranian Embassy in London during a hostage-taking siege incident in May 1980. He entered service in 1969 and retired in 1992. He died on August 26, 2011.

His heritage in the world of special forces was huge, and especially during the nineties, he was one of the main instructors for various special forces units around the world. Here you can see his interview and lookup on some special forces tactics. More about John Mac can be found here.

Part One:

Part Two:

Other parts and videos related to SAS, and the world’s special forces can be found here.

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