Naval strike missiles deployed in Pacific with sight on China

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Eric Sof
I'm the active duty law enforcement officer serving in SWAT unit. My hobby's are firearms, skiing, martial arts.

In the Pacific theatre, the tensions are high as U.S. Navy discreetly sent a warship carrying a new weapon that could shift the apportionment of power in the disputed South China sea. The USS Gabrielle Giffords is going to an unknown location, possibly to test what military analysts say a weapon that could change the streams in favor of the United States, the IBT reported.

The smooth low-profile, littoral combat ship (LCS) left San Diego port earlier this month carrying the US Navy’s newest up-to-date weapon named as Naval Strike Missile. The weapon was developed by Raytheon, a defense contractor company that has produced high-tech weapons in the past.

According to the Raytheon official statement, the Naval Strike Missile is a sea-skimming cruise missile that is tough to spot on radar. Moreover, the new tech could allegedly outmaneuver the enemy defense systems and is guided by an autonomous Northrop Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout helicopter drone.

The Naval Strike Missile is an anti-ship and land-attack missile developed by the Norwegian company Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace. (Photo: Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace)

In fact, the Naval Strike Missile is an anti-ship and land-attack missile developed by the Norwegian company Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace. The original Norwegian name was Nytt sjømålsmissil; the English marketing name Naval Strike Missile was adopted later.

The Naval Strike Missile reportedly has an effective range of approximately 100 miles (160 kilometers), 30 percent farther than the current Harpoon missiles used by the US Navy. Its capability to work with the helicopter drone enables its fleet to target outside of the radar’s effective range and to evade and strike at the target without being detected.

A spokesperson for the United States Navy’s 3rd Fleet, Commodore John Fage said that the new missile system would increase the striking power possibilities of the United States Navy. According to some military analysts, the Naval Strike Missile “has a better chance of fighting and surviving” at the disputed territories in the South China sea.

China and the US are in the middle of a territorial stand-off as both countries are aiming to control one of the busiest naval regions in the world. Since 2015, official Beijing has pressured neighboring countries through the militarization of reclaimed areas across the Asian archipelago.

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