Clint Eastwood Military Service

Eastwood served as a swimming instructor at Fort Ord, California

Clint Eastwood during his military career (Photo: Military Service)

The Hollywood star Clint Eastwood once upon a time was a soldier. Long before he dared anyone to make his day as famous Dirty Harry, he served as a swimming instructor at Fort Ord (Ft. Ord) in California. As fate (and luck) would have it, his swimming skills would come in beneficial: one time when he was hitching a ride aboard a Navy torpedo bomber Douglas AD-1Q, the plane developed engine trouble and was forced to ditch into the Pacific Ocean off the Point Reyes Peninsula near San Francisco Bay.

Clint Eastwood swam over a mile through the tide to shore, implying his own character’s watery trials in “Escape from Alcatraz.”

“I was drafted during the Korean War. None of us wanted to go… It was only a couple of years after World War II had ended. We said, ‘Wait a second? Didn’t we just get through with that?’”

During his military service, Clint Eastwood became friends with future successful TV actors Richard Long, Martin Milner and David Janssen. Despite his career wasn’t so active like he had acted in some movies, Clint remains as one of the greatest American actors and producers of all the time.

After his discharge in 1953, Eastwood attended L.A. City College and studied drama under the GI Bill. From humble origins in the movie business (he started on a $75-a-week contract with Universal Studios), he eventually found international fame in “spaghetti” westerns, the Dirty Harry series, and as an Oscar-winning director.

In 1986, he featured Marine Sgt. Thomas Highway. Sgt. Highway is a decorated veteran of two wars. On his last posting before retirement, he is surrounded by officers with no combat experience who view him as an odd, even dangerous, holdover. Highway is assigned to train a group of undisciplined recruits including Cpl. Stitch Jones, a slick hustler who has previously encountered Highway. As the old soldier prepares his men for a war they don’t believe will come, the U.S. invades Grenada.

Eastwood’s character is a fictional veteran of the battle at Heartbreak Ridge (as is one other character), for which he received the Medal of Honor. The movie itself is a fictional account of events that took place during actual operations in Grenada.