Russian Wagner PMC suffered heavy casualties in Libya

Up to 35 Russian private military contractors were killed in Libya so far

Allegedly members of secretive Russian private military contractors company Wagner during their deployment to Syria (Photo: Wiki)

In the last few days, the bodies of Russian citizens killed in Libya’s civil war were sent back home for burial. Officially, Russia isn’t part of the fighting in North Africa, which has been ongoing for several years now. But unofficially, the situation on the field is quite different. Former Russian soldiers, mostly those from SF, are part of the Wagner group. The infamous Russian private military company was engaged in Syrian conflict too.

According to the Meduza investigative journalist Liliya Yapparova, Wagner has suffered dozens of casualties in Libya so far. She also found some of the contractors’ names despite efforts to keep that information secret: even the contractors bodies are being withheld.

The latest Libyan civil war significant battle started in April of 2019 when Khalifa Haftar, a Libyan military commander ordered his forces on the march to Tripoli. That move led to significant escalation of eight-year civil war. The Haftar is fighting the UN-recognized Government of National Accord, which is also supported by Turkey, Qatar, and a U.S.-led coalition.

As it was in Syria, the first clue about significant Russian involvement in Haftar’s advance soon comes to the light. On September 9, a Twitter user wrote that seven operators from the Wagner PMC had been killed in a bombing outside Tripoli. It goes in correlation with Bloomberg media outlet who reported about the “arrival of more than 100 mercenaries from the Wagner group had arrived at a forward base in Libya in the first week of September to support eastern strongman Khalifa Haftar’s assault on the capital Tripoli.”

According to the Meduza sources, around 35 Russian mercenaries operating under the Wagner PMC have been killed in the Libyan conflict. At least five Wagner operators and commanders, as well as a handful of FSB and MVD veterans with ties to the company, have spoken under the condition of anonymity and revealed some information about casualties. They claim that the operators in question were from Russia’s Krasnodar, Sverdlovsk, and Murmansk regions.

Maxim Khlopin, the director of the Ural branch of the Donbas Union of Volunteers, called a Wagner commander who had seen the attack firsthand. That commander said two of the Russian casualties were Artyom “Hulk” Nevyantsev and Ignat “Benya” Borichev. Borichev’s brother had previously died while working as a personal bodyguard for former Ukrainian separatist commander Alexander “Batman” Bednov. Bednov was assassinated in the same attack.

The weird situation for the families of the operators allegedly killed in Libya is that neither the Russian government nor Wagner itself has formally notified the families of any combat deaths. This is contrary to the PMC’s typical practice, which is to send death certificates and any military decorations to the relatives of combatants who are killed. The families have lost contact with their loved ones, but officially their fate remains unknown.

* Formally speaking, Wagner doesn’t exist, but it’s commonly associated with the catering magnate Evgeny Prigozhin. The reports from Russia and abroad have reported that “Wagner” is the call sign for Dmitry Utkin, who allegedly leads the company, which has allegedly fielded combatants in Syria, Sudan, the Central African Republic, and eastern Ukraine. The latest information on their alleged deployment was related to the Venezuelan crisis earlier this year. The lack of information in the Utkin case is the indicator that he doesn’t want to be known. It is believed that he is to be about 49 years old, and until 2014 he was listed in Russia’s United State Register of Legal Entities as the commander of the 700th Special Forces Unit of the Russian Military Intelligence Directorate’s 2nd Special Detachment