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Laser Target Designator (LTD) for special forces

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Laser Target Designators for special forces

In the modern warfare, the usage of so-called ‘smart’ bombs – such as the Paveway series used in Operation Allied Force against Serb forces in Kosovo – allow a warhead to be delivered with pinpoint accuracy against a designated target – even to the point of flying a bomb in through the doorway or ventilation shaft of a hardened shelter in high-percentage of accuracy.

Today, the Laser designators are necessary portable devices carried by various special forces units such Air Controllers units for the purpose of marking ground targets for friendly air assets. Laser designator consists of an optical sight, coded laser emitter and range finder. Regular Laser Target Designators (LTD) are available in various sizes but are usually mounted on tripods to ensure a stable aiming platform.

The feature provided by the Laser Target Designators have many advantages over the conventional ‘dumb’ or ‘iron’ bombs dropped from aircraft and left to fall unguided because the Laser Guided Bombs (LGBs) reduce the risk of collateral damage and that enables the attacking force to do considerably greater damage to enemy targets and resources. In most cases, to ensure high accuracy in marking targets and aiming those bombs Laser Target Designator (LTD) is used.

The crucial point, to make all this work is that the target must be illuminated accurately with a laser beam to guide the bomb. The laser target designator (LTD) is not only used by ground forces. It may be also mounted on an aircraft, or otherwise deployed on the ground, often by special forces operating behind enemy lines to locate targets and ‘designate’ them for attacking air assets.

British military use the Pilkington LF25 laser target designator (LTD). This type of Laser Target Designator only 8 kg and that makes it ideal for the special forces because it can be carried by a single soldier, either in its transit case or in a bergen. The instructions recommending it to be set up on a small folding tripod. The Pilkington LF25 have a built-in x10 telescope through which the operator aligns the laser beam. There is also an interface for an image intensifier or thermal imaging sight, allowing the unit to be used in virtually any conditions, day or night.

The Laser Target Designators are regular equipment of the ground special forces for the country’s with high sophisticated Air Forces. Most of the airstrikes in Iraq and Syria these days are carried out with the help of LTD’s.

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Personal Equipment

World’s Meal Ready-to-Eat (MRE) combat rations

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Italy Meal Ready-to-Eat (MRE)

One of biggest challenges for world’s armies is the meal for soldiers on the battlefields and those operating in most dangerous operations. Combat rations or the meals for soldiers in such missions needs to be light weight because they are already preoccupied with heavy equipment.

On the other side, the meal needs to be rich with energy and vitamins and to fit every need of the person which could expect heavy physical effort.

These meal packages are called MRE (Meal Ready-to-Eat). Every country has the different one. Photographers Fabrizia Parisi and Giulio Iacchetti took pictures of the different MRE through the world.

 

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Personal Equipment

What is C-A-T Tourniquet and how to use it properly?

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CAT Tourniquet FIRST AID

A C-A-T tourniquet is a revolutionary tool for modern military soldier intended to stop arm or leg blood flow due to injury on the battlefield. Tourniquet effectiveness as the life-saving instrument plays a significant role in modern warfare and injury medical care. It was used widely by doctors and surgeons to control venous and arterial circulation to an extremity for a period of time, especially during surgeries.

Standard use guidelines for the military

In a Care under Fire situation, treatment normally consists of using a tourniquet immediately to stop major bleeding of the extremities. In a TFC (Tactical Field Care) situation, the Trained and Authorized rescuer will perform all treatment necessary, using a tourniquet as a last resort and should only be applied when bleeding cannot be stopped and the situation is life threatening.

How to properly use C-A-T Tourniquet?

The Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T) is widely used by U.S. and US-coalition military. It was developed by Composite Resources, Inc. It is also used by NHS ambulance services, and some UK fire and rescue services. The unit utilizes a windlass with a locking mechanism and can be self-applied. The (C-A-T) has been adopted by military and emergency personnel all around the world. Here is instruction manual for C-A-T tourniquet:

Two-handed application

  1. Apply tourniquet proximal to the bleeding site. Route the band around the limb and pass the red tip through the inside slit of the buckle.
  2. Pass the red tip through the outside slit of the buckle. The buckle will lock the band in place.
  3. Pull the band very tight and securely fasten the band back on itself.
  4. Twist the rod until bright red bleeding has stopped and the distal pulse is eliminated.
  5. Place the rod inside the clip; locking it in place. Check for bleeding and distal pulse. If bleeding is not controlled, consider additional tightening or applying a second tourniquet proximal side by ide to the first and reassess.
  6. Secure the rod inside the clip with the strap. Prepare the patient for transport and reassess. Record the time of tourniquet application.

One-handed application

  1. Apply tourniquet proximal to the bleeding site. Insert the wounded limb through the loop formed by the band.
  2. Pull the band very tight and securely fasten the band back on itself.
  3. Adhere to the band around the limb. Do not adhere the band past the rod clip.
  4. Twist the rod until bright red bleeding has stopped and the distal pulse is eliminated.
  5. Place the rod inside the clip locking it in place. Check for bleeding and distal pulse. If bleeding is not controlled, consider additional tightening or applying a second tourniquet proximal side by side to the first and reassess.
  6. Adhere the band over the rod, inside the clip, and fully around the limb.
  7. Secure the rod and band with the strap. Prepare for transport and reassess. If possible, record time of application on a white strap.

For sure is that C-A-T tourniquet is a revolutionary tool which already saves hundreds of lives on battlefields and personally, for me, it is a must have part of my first aid kit.

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