Connect with us

Guns

Why is Russian fearsome thermobaric flamethrower hotter than the sun

Published

on

The burning projectile fired by Russia’s TOS-1A heavy thermobaric flamethrower system is capable of making life a living hell for anyone within its reach. Aptly dubbed “Solntsepyok” (Sunheat), the TOS-1A heavy flamethrower system is a 220 mm 24-barrel multiple rocket launcher and thermobaric weapon mounted on a T-72 tank chassis.

Russian fearsome thermobaric flamethrower’s secrets revealed

It has gained a uniquely nasty reputation because of the horrifying effects of its fuel-air explosive warheads.
The TOS-1A fires thermobaric rockets, which disperse a cloud of flammable liquid into the air around the target, and then ignite it. The effect of their explosion is absolutely devastating as the blast lasts significantly longer and the resulting shockwave is much hotter and more powerful than anything other conventional warheads can boast of.

As if that was not enough, all the oxygen in the vicinity of the explosion is also consumed creating a partial vacuum. All this makes the TOS-1A a horrifying weapon against enemy personnel hiding in bunkers and caves and has earned it the well-deserved title of “the most devastating explosive weapons short of tactical nuclear weapons around.”

Vladimir Medvedev, the chief designer at SPLAV R&D Association, which developed the system’s missile, told Zvezda TV that it was originally meant to have a range of 3.,5 kilometers (2.3 miles), but was later upgraded to fly up to six kilometers (three miles). The minimum range of 600 meters (yards) was preserved though, which means that the Solntsepyok can fire virtually point-blank.

The missile travels along a very steep trajectory literally “falling” on an enemy’s head. Targeting is done with the help of an optical sight with a laser rangefinder and ballistic calculator. They position the launcher at a proper angle and all the operator needs to do is pull the trigger.

A single TOS-1A packs more firepower than several 18-howitzer batteries. Fire preparation is just a tiny fraction of what conventional multiple rocket launchers need to open up.

The TOS-1A is the only such thermobaric flamethrower around, but Vladimir Medvedev believes that impressed by its performance in real combat situations, foreign weapons designers are likely to start developing heir own such systems.

Meanwhile, unwilling to rest on its laurels, the SPLAV designers are already setting their sight on a new generation of heavy flamethrower systems lovingly dubbed “Tosochka” (Baby TOS).

In addition to the TOS-1A’s predecessor, the Tosochka, already included in the 2018-2025 State Armament Program, will also have a wheeled chassis making it ideal for use in the desert and for potential buyers from the Middle East. The Tosochka is expected to be showcased during the Army —2017 international forum scheduled for later this month.

I'm the active duty law enforcement officer serving in SWAT unit. My hobby's are firearms, skiing, martial arts.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Guns

Czechs civilians get right to shoot terrorists on sight

Deputies in the Czech Republic voted overwhelmingly in favor of a constitutional amendment allowing ordinary citizens to carry arms and use them in a case of a public emergency such as terrorism.

Published

on

The Czech parliament has approved a constitutional amendment on security that allows ordinary citizens to take up arms against terrorists. On Wednesday, 139 of the 168-member Chamber of Deputies voted for the amendment, which was proposed by Interior Minister Milan Chovanec of the Czech Social Democratic Party (ČSSD), in response to an EU directive on firearms that was adopted earlier this year.

“We do not want to disarm our own people at a time when the security situation is deteriorating,” Chovanec said during the parliamentary debate on Wednesday. “Show me a single terrorist attack in Europe perpetrated using a legally-owned weapon,” he said.

‘Interior Minister Milan Chovanec for the defense of his home and country.’

The new law states that Czech citizens have the right to acquire, keep and bear arms in order to ensure the security of the state.

It means that the approximately 360,000 licensed gun-owners in the Czech Republic are allowed to carry their weapons in public and use them in case of a public order emergency, such as terrorism.

The EU directive, which was drawn up by the Commission in the aftermath of terrorist attacks in Paris and Brussels, was adopted by the EU Council in April. It includes a ban on civilian use of short semi-automatic firearms with loading devices over 20 rounds and long semi-automatic firearms with loading devices over 10 rounds, as well as long firearms that can be easily concealed, for example by means of a folding or telescopic stock.

The directive was criticized by politicians, gun owners and hunters in the Czech Republic, who argue the directive is an infringement of national sovereignty and their right to bear arms.
As well as the constitutional amendment, which still has to be approved by the Senate and the President, the Czech government has also said it will file a complaint with the European Court of Justice about the directive by August 17.

Although Western European countries such as France, Belgium, Germany and the UK have suffered several terrorist attacks in recent years, the Czech Republic has not seen any attacks. The Global Peace Index 2016 ranked the country the sixth safest in the world.

Continue Reading

Guns

The US Army in panic mode: ‘We need more powerful rifles, Taliban out-ranged us’

Published

on

The U.S. Army officially asked industry for information on a new 7.62-by-51-millimeter rifle. The request dated May 30, 2017,  signals the US Army’s intention to begin moving away from the 5.56-by-45-millimeter M-16 and M-4 that have been the ground-combat branch’s main firearms for generations. In fact, the M4 carbine is extensively used by the United States Armed Forces and is largely replacing the M16 rifle in United States Army and the United States Marine Corps combat units as the primary infantry weapon.

The US Army in panic mode: ‘We need more powerful rifles, Taliban out-ranged us’

The Army’s RFI comes hot on the heels of the U.S. Marine Corps’ own RFI for a new off-the-shelf infantry rifle. But the US Army’s so-called “Interim Combat Service Rifle” could be a stopgap — a weapon the service buys quickly while it considers longer-term solutions to its firearms needs. In the short term, the ICSR could complement the 7.62-millimeter M-14, itself a stopgap.

The RFI “should not be construed as a request for proposal or as an obligation on the part of the government to acquire any services or hardware,” the Army stated. The service just wants to know what 7.62-millimeter rifle designs are available. The Army hasn’t set aside any funding for buying or testing a new weapon. Yet.

So what is the US Army is really looking for? The RFI requests commercial, readily-available designs with 16- or 20-inch barrels, the ability to fix muzzle devices capable of flash- and sound-suppression, fully-ambidextrous controls, a rail system, optics mounts and an adjustable butt-stock.

The RFI also requests backup iron sights, an overall weight of less than 12 pounds and a minimum magazine capacity of 20 rounds.

The US Army’s fresh interest in a larger caliber firearm reflects recent combat experience. In Afghanistan, Taliban fighters armed with Russian-made 7.62-by-54-millimeter weapons frequently out-ranged U.S. and NATO troops.

Another problem is modern ceramic body armor, which the current 5.56-millimeter round might struggle to penetrate. But The Firearms Blog speculated that the problem lies with the composition of the current round, not its size.

“For a 7.62-millimeter rifle to be effective, it must fire not the current M80A1 round, but a tungsten-cored [armor-piercing] round such as the M993 or the upcoming XM1158 ADVAP, which almost certainly also has a tungsten core,” the WarIsBoring noted.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Most Popular