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Russian MoD reveals rare footage of Armata MBT in action

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The Russian Defense Ministry revealed a rare footage of the Armata battle tank in action. The Armata is a modern Russian main battle tank project. Sometimes it is referred as T-14. Its development commenced in 2011. The Armata was developed as a replacement to the canceled T-95. The whole project was kept in high secrecy. First mock-up was revealed to Russian military officials in 2013. Trials commenced in 2014.

The modern MBT was first publicly revealed in 2015. The first batch of 12 to 32 tanks was delivered in 2015. It seems that these tanks were built mainly for parades. Still full-scale production could start soon. It is planned that Armata will replace the aging T-72 and T-80 with T-90 that become out-dated.

The Armata is a new-generation tank. It has small in common with the current T-90. Exact technical specifications of this MBT remain classified. It has been reported that this main battle tank is operated by a crew of only 2 men, including commander and driver. If it is true, so far it is the only MBT to have such a small crew. Older Russian tanks have a crew of 3. While most Western MBTs have a crew of 4. Reduction of the crew to just 2 men allowed to reduce crew compartment, overall the size of the vehicle and improve protection.

The Armata might be one of the most protected MBTs in the world. It has been reported that it has newly developed armor, made of steel, ceramics and composite materials. Also, it has been reported that Armata has a Malakhit add-on explosive reactive armor of modern generation. As usual, this MBT is fitted with NBC protection and automatic fire suppression systems. It has been reported that Armata will be fitted with modern Afganit active protection system. It seems that it also has a modern countermeasures system that reduces the chance of being hit by enemy ATGW with semi-automatic guidance. This modern Russian tank uses smoke grenade dischargers of

It seems that it also has a modern countermeasures system that reduces the chance of being hit by enemy ATGW with semi-automatic guidance. This modern Russian tank uses smoke grenade dischargers of a modern type.

It has been reported that crew members are seated in a well protected armored capsule. It is separated from automatic loader and ammo. The tank has improved hardness to damage. It can fight even with penetrated armor, as far as the crew cell is intact.

The Armata will be armed with a 2A82 125-mm smoothbore gun. It has improved ballistics comparing with a 2A46M gun of the T-90 MBT. The gun is mounted in the unmanned turret and is completed with an autoloader. This tank will be capable of firing gun-launched anti-tank guided rockets in the same manner as ordinary rounds. These rockets have a range of about 5 km and can also target low-flying helicopters.

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U.S. Commandos Want This Technology for Special Forces Raids

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For Dungeons & Dragons roleplayers, part of the fun of make-believe adventure is searching for hidden chambers where the monsters keep their treasure. For that matter, it’s a familiar theme in horror movies to have villains and vampires pop out from behind walls and bookcases.

But for U.S. commandos, hidden compartments are not entertainment. They are obstacles to a successful mission to capture fugitives, or seize documents and weapons. And on a house raid in hostile territory, there isn’t a lot of time to go tapping on walls to find a stash.

That’s why U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) wants a detector that can quickly spot where the loot is hidden. The goal of the research project is to develop a handheld device that can detect hidden chambers in an average-sized room (168 square feet) and at a range of about 6.5 feet during sensitive site exploitation, or SSE, operations.

The sensor should be able to penetrate to a depth of 2 feet and have enough battery power to run for forty to fifty minutes. However, while it needs to detect hidden spaces, it doesn’t need to scan the contents inside. “It doesn’t have to ‘see’ thru a metal surface/container; the presence of a metal chamber in a wall would be a suspicious indication,” SOCOM says.

Sensors that detect the presence of humans, such as infrared, acoustic or radar, already exist or are being developed. But current technology is either too bulky or too complicated, says SOCOM. But developing a handy device poses technical challenges. SOCOM emphasizes that the sensor must be able to distinguish between normal spaces in a wall, such as the gap between studs, and hidden compartments. It also must be able to function with a variety of building materials, including brick, cinder block, concrete, wood and sheet rock. “The system should be able to distinguish suspicious hidden cinder block openings vs normal cinder block voids in normal wall construction,” SOCOM adds.

And the device has to be easy to use and reliable. “For the operator to be willing to carry/operate an additional system, along with all of his other equipment, the system performance needs to be high; a system with low detection rates or high false detection rates will be left behind,” SOCOM points out.

SOCOM suggests that cutting-edge technologies such as modern radio frequency transmit/receive modules, advanced computer vision algorithms and modern computer processors may enable a solution to be found. The research proposal did contain links to a Wikipedia entry on ground-penetrating radar, and a Florida company called Ground Hound Detection Services that detects the presence of underground utilities before construction begins in an area.

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Persistent Systems unveils new Dual Channel Push-to-Talk (PTT) device for the MPU5

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Persistent Systems, LLC (“Persistent”) announced today that it is unveiling its new Dual Channel Push-to-Talk (“Dual PTT”) accessory for the MPU5. The Dual PTT, said company officials, will allow the MPU5’s audio capabilities to reach their full potential.

The Dual PTT allows the user to quickly and easily select between 16 talk groups as well as control volume levels for each talk group independently. When paired with a stereo headset, the two selected talk groups are heard in the left and right ears, and the volume level in each ear can be controlled independently.

Dual PTT will improve networked communications and eliminate extra legacy radios

With the MPU5 and Dual PTT, a single MPU5 can communicate on two talk groups either independently (by pressing a single PTT button) or simultaneously (by pressing both PTT buttons). In the past, when a user needed to communicate with two different groups (channels) of users, that user needed to carry two separate Land Mobile Radios (LMRs). Therefore, the MPU5 and Dual PTT significantly reduces size, weight, power, and cost (SWaP-C) burdens on users.

This is possible because the MPU5 is an IP radio, where talk groups are multicast addresses, instead of an LMR radio, where channels are different RF frequencies.

Dual PTT will improve networked communications and eliminate extra legacy radios

“It used to be that a commander would have to carry a PRC-148 and a PRC-152,” said Brian Mcdonald, Field Operations Manager at Persistent. “Now the commander just carries the MPU5 and can use the Dual PTT to talk to both groups. Carrying one radio instead of two will both save money as well as reduce the load on the soldier, which is a major selling point with customers,” Mcdonald explained.

The Dual PTT also serves as the interface into the MPU5’s Radio over IP (RoIP) subsystem. Users can tether legacy LMR radio systems to the MPU5, and associate each of those radios with one of the 16 talk groups as a multicast address on the network. When an MPU5 user communicates on that talk group, the MPU5 “keys up” the LMR radio and transmits audio through it.

“For the warfighter, this means one can tether a TACSAT channel on a vehicle to the RoIP port on the MPU5 and talk on TACSAT from within a building or tunnel while carrying only an MPU5 and Dual PTT,” said Dr. Herbert Rubens, Founder and CEO of Persistent. “The MPU5’s RoIP capability is compatible with PRC-148s, PRC-152s, Tactical Satellite (TACSAT), Fires Net, Public Safety LMRs, or standard walkie-talkies, which means, for example, being able to talk to Command Net, Assault Net, Fires Net, etc. whenever it’s suddenly required by the mission.”

Persistent has begun accepting orders for the Dual PTT.

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