The favorite gun of Delta operators during the Battle of Mogadishu

Former Delta operator Norman Hooten (bottom right) pictured with other special operations soldiers in Somalia (Photo: MilitaryTimes)

One of the most exposed special operations in US history has become a Battle of Mogadishu. On October 4th, 1993, gunfire still rocked Mogadishu, the Somalian capital in the longest continuous firefight American troops had been involved in since Vietnam. The operation went wrong and US special operations forces were encircled and were taken heavy fire. Among the operators on the ground were also members of C Squadron, 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment – Delta, known as Delta Force. Hailing from the highly secretive Joint Special Operations Command, these men, dubbed “operators,” were (and still are) considered some of the most elite and most secretive special ops warfighters in the world.

In the New York Times bestseller book, Black Hawk Down, author Mark Bowen describes a CAR-15 rifle as a favorite weapon among Delta Force operators. Since then, the rifle has been relegated to the history textbooks, collectors shelves, and the hearts of military cloners everywhere. CAR-15, the modular weapon which represented a major step forward in both the special operations community, as well as the broader American combat arms forces as a whole.

A Delta Force operator wielding a CAR-15 while serving on Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf's protective detail during the Persian Gulf War.
A Delta Force operator wielding a CAR-15 while serving on Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf’s protective detail during the Persian Gulf War. (Photo: DoD)

CAR-15 abbreviation for Colt Automatic Rifle-15, the name meant to describe a variety of guns built off the original M16 assault rifle produced for the US military, including short-barreled carbines and submachine guns. However, by the late 1980s, to members of America’s special operations apparatus, CAR-15 described something slightly different.

Short for Colt Automatic Rifle-15, the title was used to describe a variety of guns built off the original M16 assault rifle produced for the US military, including short-barreled carbines and submachine guns. However, by the late 1980s, to members of America’s special operations apparatus, CAR-15 described something slightly different.

A Delta Force operator with a CAR-15
A Delta Force operator with a CAR-15 is seen in the foreground of this picture (Photo: DoD/Staff Sergeant Dean W. Wagner)

The 653 rifle was popular with the US Navy’s SEAL teams for years, in addition to other SOCOM units. By the late 1980s, the CAR-15 mantle moved on to the Colt 723, an improvement on the 653, and Delta operators got their hands on the now-legendary carbine.

According to Larry Vickers, a former operator involved with some of Delta’s most daring exploits and missions said that 723s could be issued at the time with either a thin “pencil” barrel or a thicker cutout barrel designed for use with the under barrel M203 grenade launcher. Delta armorers additionally modified the two-position stock so that the stock would be adjusted to extend to a length that was comfortable for each operator while wearing body armor.

The gun’s non-removable carrying handle that came with the modified M16A1 upper receiver (with a case deflector) usually played host to a red dot sight on a special mount. Earlier on, Delta used Aimpoint 2000 sights before moving on to the 3000 and 5000 scopes by 1993.

The CAR-15 faithfully served Delta well into the mid-1990s until it was eventually replaced by Colt’s M4 carbine, which maximized the strengths of its predecessor while mitigating perceived weaknesses.

Delta Force General prefer 1911 instead of Glock as his sidearm

General Miller brandishing Glock pistol at his hip
In this picture, the general appears to be carrying a Glock in a hip holster with a threaded barrel, and what looks like a red dot sight mounted on the slide. From the picture, it’s difficult to determine the model of the gun. (Photo: XY)

How a top U.S. Army general ditch his 1911 pistol instead of a Glock? Well, easy, when you wear four stars in the Army, you get a bit of leeway in what you carry as your personal sidearm.

Though 1911 has been mostly out of service with the US military for years, having last been widely fielded by various Marine Corps special operations units, there’s an incredibly cool relationship between Miller and the back-to-back world war champ pistol.

Indeed, that ages-old tradition hasn’t yet gone away, as we reported last year when pictures of Gen. Austin “Scott” Miller, the commander of all US forces in Afghanistan, surfaced with him carrying a tricked-out 1911 as his sidearm. Gen. Miller is also known as “Delta Force General.”

General Miller brandishing his 1911 sidearm
General Miller brandishing his 1911 sidearm (Photo: XY)

A picture of the commander of all U.S. troops in Afghanistan, Gen. Austin “Scott” Miller, has been taken showing him wearing a tricked-out 1911 as his sidearm. Despite 1911 pistol is out of service in the Army, it is still used by Marine Corps special operations units. Miller served as an operator with the Army’s 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta before he became a four-star general. Back then, 1911 was what the operators trained on to perfect marksmanship. Although the Unit moved away from 1911 and opted for a Glock solution in .40 S&W, by the 1990s 1911 pistol was retooled to perfection with boosted reliability and accuracy.

In 2009, General Miller chose 1911 to be his sidearm, but most of the modifications have been kept a secret. Miller does have a second preference, however. When he is not carrying his 1911, Miller prefers a Glock, a pistol that SOCOM warfighters are well acquainted with. In a photo, Miller appears to be carrying a Glock with a threaded barrel with a red dot sight mounted on the slide. In this particular picture, it is hard to determine the model; however, Miller was spotted at an awards ceremony carrying a Glock 19 with a threaded barrel.

Indeed, that ages-old tradition hasn’t yet gone away, as we reported last year when pictures of Gen. Austin “Scott” Miller, the commander of all US forces in Afghanistan, surfaced with him carrying a tricked-out 1911 as his sidearm.

Inside An Army Ranger Team Room Somewhere In Afghanistan

75th Rangers Regiment Team Room in Afghanistan
75th Rangers Regiment Team Room in Afghanistan (Photo: DVIDs)

Being an Army Ranger and a member of the 75th Ranger Regiment is something special. The Regiment has provided important direct action raiding forces in War on Terror for years. Here’s a look at the tools in their team room.

The U.S. Army’s elite 75th Ranger Regiment has released a rare set of photos from inside a team room with personal weapons of its personnel in Afghanistan. Rotating contingents of Army Rangers have served for years as key direct action forces for conducting raids on the Taliban and other terrorist groups in the country. The secretive Joint Special Operations Command has often directed these operations and they have sometimes been in cooperation with the most capable of the Afghan military’s own special operations units.

The set of photos posted by the 75th Ranger Regiment online through the U.S. military’s Defense Visual Information Distribution Service were taken nearly a year earlier at an undisclosed location in Afghanistan. A flag seen in the background of some of the pictures indicates that deployed elements of the Regiment’s 3rd Battalion were using the armory at the time.

Each of the pictures has the same brief caption, which reads:

“U.S. special operations service members conduct combat operations in support of Operation Resolute Support in Afghanistan, February 2019. RS is a NATO-led mission to train, advise, and assist the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces and institutions.”

Though there is no detailed description for each picture, it is easy to recognize weapons and other gear that Rangers are using on operations in Afghanistan, including modified M4A1 carbines, Mk 48 light machine guns, and an 84mm Carl Gustaf M3 recoilless rifle. The last weapon is one that has been in use around the world for decades, but which only came to the U.S. military in the late 1980s when the Rangers adopted them.

The use of the Carl Gustaf subsequently expanded throughout the U.S. special operations forces community and, more recently, the recoilless rifles have begun to make their way to conventional Army and Marine Corps units, according to the Drive.

Rangers Team Room Afghanistan Armory
Various guns at the Rangers Team Room in Afghansitan (Photo: DVIDs)
A trio of 7.62mm Mk 48 light machine guns. These guns also have laser aiming devices and a version of the Elcan Specter DR with 1.5x and 6x magnification modes
A trio of 7.62mm Mk 48 light machine guns. These guns also have laser aiming devices and a version of the Elcan Specter DR with 1.5x and 6x magnification modes. (Photo: DVIDs)

 

Another shot with the M3 recoilless rifle in the background.
Another shot with the M3 recoilless rifle in the background. (Photo: DVIDs)
An M3 Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle is just barely visible in the background on the floor. What appears to be an 84mm illumination round, which contains a parachute flare, is to its immediate right.
An M3 Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle is just barely visible in the background on the floor. What appears to be an 84mm illumination round, which contains a parachute flare, is to its immediate right. (Photo: DVIDs)
Rangers Team Room Afghanistan Individual with no Patches
An individual in the Armory with no visible unit patches inspects one of the M4A1 carbines with an EOTech Model 553 sight. (Photo: DVIDs)
Mk 48 with their barrels removed and stacks of spare barrels underneath.
Mk 48 with their barrels removed and stacks of spare barrels underneath. (Photo: DVIDs)
A close up of one of the Ranger M4A1s with an EOTech Model 553 sight.
A close up of one of the Ranger M4A1s with an EOTech Model 553 sight. (Photo: DVIDs)
US Army Rangers 75th Regiment Personal Gear Helmets
Other personal gear is also visible in the armory. This includes this row of helmets with night-vision goggles attached, at least one of which also has an infrared strobe light to help friendly aircraft identify the Rangers on the ground. (Photo: DVIDs)

U.S. M-ATV vehicle runs a Russian Tigr armored utility vehicle off the road in Syria

Road Rage US Armored Vehicle drive off Russian GAZ Tigr off the road
Crazy Video Emerges Of American And Russian Armored Vehicle Road Rage Incident In Syria (Photo: XY)

A last week’s incident between U.S. Special Operations Forces and their Russian counterpart has not yet been resolved and a new video of road rage has been allegedly caught on camera. A crazy video of alleged American and Russian armored vehicle road rage incident in Syria has surfaced online.

Details about the incident are still limited, but according to the description, it occurred on February 19, 2020 near the town of Qamishli in northeast Syria.

A video shows a U.S. military M-ATV mine-resistant vehicle running a Russian GAZ Tigr armored utility vehicle off the road somewhere near the town of Qamishli in northeastern Syria. The incident reportedly occurred relatively close to where U.S. Special Operations Forces found themselves in a last weeks’ standoff with a mob of civilians and militiamen aligned with Syrian dictator Bashar Al Assad a week ago. Russian forces were also present during that altercation, which ultimately left at least one Syrian dead.

A camera inside what appears to be a civilian vehicle also traveling along the same stretch of road captured the incident. The town of Qamishli is near the Turkish-Syrian border. It is unclear when exactly the events in the video actually occurred, but according to the description of the video, it happened yesterday.

Up to 100,000$ per reenlistment bonus in Special Forces

Green berets conduct training at shooting range
U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets) operator conduct training at shooting range (Photo: XY)

Six-figures big bonuses were always reserved for the managers in big private companies, but these days the Army offering the same for Green Berets. The Army wants them so badly, that they’re willing to pay big money for it.

A Military Personnel Message released Monday by Army Human Resources Command says the Army is offering Special Forces Warrant OfficersUS Army Special Forces (SF) lump sum accession bonuses of $20,000 for six years of service, and lump sum retention bonuses of $100,000 for another five years of service, to Special Forces Warrant Officers, the Task & Purpose reported.

It’s no wonder the Army wants to hold onto these operators— the specialized skills they pick up over the course of their careers are of high value. The accession bonus is targeted towards senior non-commissioned officers who go into the Warrant Officer cohort, according to CW5 Jeffrey Burmeister, command chief warrant officer for the Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School.

The $100,000 bonus is for mid-level warrant officers who may be deciding whether or not to continue with their military career.

“These warrants are, generally speaking, mid-level managers with 17 to 19 years of military service getting ready to make a change in their life direction, deciding whether to go over 20 or join the civilian workforce,” Burmeister said.

“The skills and experience they have can command high paying jobs. To maintain readiness, the Army is now offering a bonus to incentivize them to stay in the military.”

Operators are not eligible for the retention bonuses if the renewed service obligation will take them over 25 years of service, the MILPER message stated. The current offer is available until the end of the fiscal year with a deadline on Sept. 30, 2020.

There is also an offer to warrant officers to join the Army Air Defense artillery branch and the Army is ready to offer up to $60,000 in bonuses for officers willing to join.